Digital Postcard No. 11: The FWAA’s 1987 All-America Team Reply

(Ed. Note: This is the eleventh in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.) 

In 1987…..Plans for Disneyland Paris were announced…First Starbucks outside Seattle opened in Vancouver and Chicago…The Dow closed over 2,000 for the first time…Pound of bacon sold for $1.80…..The Simpsons cartoon first appeared….Platoon won Best Picture…Aretha Franklin was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame….President Ronald Reagan gave his tear down the Berlin Wall speech.

On the 1987 FWAA All-America team, Syracuse quarterback Don McPherson was named first team as the Orangemen grabbed the Lambert Trophy as the best team in the East and claimed a berth in the Sugar Bowl. The FWAA’s Coach of the Year was also from Syracuse, Dick MacPherson. Miami (Florida) won the national championship, edging Oklahoma, 20-14, in the Orange Bowl behind a defense led by FWAA All-America Daniel Stubbs. Air Force’s Chad Hennings claimed the 1987 Outland Trophy. Other stars of the FWAA All-America team were South Carolina’s Sterling Sharpe, Oklahoma’s Keith Jackson, Florida State’s Deion Sanders and Michigan State’s Lorenzo White.

COTTON BOWL NUGGET:

Notre Dame’s Tim Brown, an FWAA All-America as a returner, led the Fighting Irish into the Cotton Bowl where they dropped a 35-10 decision to Texas A&M.  Brown, a Dallas native, was the first Irish Heisman Trophy winner to play in a bowl game and third Heisman Trophy winner to play in the Cotton Bowl in four seasons. He returned the opening kickoff 37 yards and caught a touchdown pass for a 7-0 Irish lead, before the Aggies took over in the second half.

Tim Brown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9T67HDocsEY 

Your 1987 FWAA Selectors

  • Lee L. Richards, Eastern Football Magazine
  • Bill Millsaps, Richmond Times-Dispatch
  • Jack Hairston, Gainesville Sun
  • Melanie Hauser, Houston Post
  • Tom Shatel, Kansas City Star-Times
  • Bob Pille, Chicago Sun-Times
  • Bob Hammond, Laramie Daily Boomerang
  • Bob Hurt, Arizona Republic
  • Gordon White, New York Times

Digital Postcard No. 10: The FWAA’s 1984 All-America Team Reply

(Ed. Note: This is the tenth in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.) 

Digital Postcard 1984

In 1984….Terms of Endearment won Best Picture….The Soviet Union boycotted the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles…Bruce Springsteen released Born in the USA….Jeopardy began its syndicated series with Alex Trebek…President Ronald Reagan was re-elected in a landslide…The average home that year in the U.S. cost $21,600.00…The original Apple Macintosh PC was on sale for $2,500.00.

Boston College’s Doug Flutie was the quarterback on the FWAA’s 1984 All-America Team by virtue of his 48-yard “Hail Mary Pass” for a touchdown that beat defending national champion Miami, Fla., 47-45, on the last play of the Eagles’ final regular-season game.  Mississippi Valley State wide receiver Jerry Rice, who later would go on to stardom in the NFL, was a member of the FWAA team despite playing in Division I-AA (FCS).

Big-name linemen dotted the team: Pittsburgh’s Bill Fralic, Virginia Tech’s Bruce Smith (the 1984 Outland Trophy winner) and Oklahoma’s Tony Casillas. Texas defensive back Jerry Gray, a two-time selection, and Georgia’s Kevin Butler, one of two kickers in the College Football Hall of Fame, were other big names on the team. BYU and Coach LaVell Edwards swept the FWAA’s Grantland Rice and Coach of the Year Awards.

Flutie Play: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3ykWbu2Gl0

COTTON BOWL NUGGET:

Flutie followed up the Miami thriller by directing a 45-28 Boston College victory over Houston on Jan. 1, 1985. Flutie was the seventh Heisman Trophy winner to play in the Cotton Bowl game. Defensive lineman Mike Ruth, a Boston College junior in 1984, claimed the Outland Trophy in 1985.

Your 1984 FWAA Selectors

  • Gordon White, New York Times
  • Wilt Browning, Greensboro News & Record
  • Alf Van Hoose, Birmingham News
  • Jack Gallagher, Houston Post
  • Tom Shatel, Kansas City Star-Times
  • Kaye Kessler, Columbus Dispatch
  • Dick Rosetta, Salt Lake City Tribune
  • Murray Olderman, Newspaper Enterprise Association
  • Pat Harmon, Cincinnati Post

Digital Postcard No. 9: The FWAA’s 1983 All-America Team

(Ed. Note: This is the ninth in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.)

In 1983…. A record 125 million watched the final episode of M*A*S*H*…Motown celebrated its 25-year anniversary…First mobile phones were released by Motorola…A Ford Mustang cost $6,572.00….U.S. Unemployment rose to 12 million, highest since 1941.

The FWAA All-America Team featured three offensive players from Nebraska: running back Mike Rozier, wingback Irving Fryar and offensive lineman Dean Steinkuhler.  It marked the third straight season, a Nebraska player captured the Outland Trophy after Dave Rimington’s back-to-back in 1981 and 1982.  Auburn’s Bo Jackson, who later would win the Heisman in 1985 and become a professional baseball-football star after college, was also on the team as a sophomore.

Bo Jackson video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pe-mVW-z2jA

There was plenty of firepower on defense on this FWAA team as well: Tennessee’s Reggie White, Clemson’s William Perry (The Refrigerator) and Cal’s Ron Rivera. Miami’s Howard Schnellenberger claimed the FWAA’s Coach of the Year Award.

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

Georgia defeated previously unbeaten Texas, 10-9, in a Classic at Fair Park.  A fumbled punt by Texas in the fourth quarter led to Georgia’s winning points on the ensuing drive.  But Miami would be the consensus national champion after besting top-ranked Nebraska in the Orange Bowl when the Cornhuskers’ last-gasp rally fell short on a missed two-point conversion.

Orange Bowl ending:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoNs0mdKAO8

Your 1983 FWAA Selectors

  • Arnie Burdick, Syracuse Herald-Journal
  • Wilt Browning, Greensboro Daily News
  • Al Ludwick, Augusta Chronicle-Herald
  • Ish Haley, Dallas Times-Herald
  • Steve Richardson, Kansas City Star-Times
  • Pat Harmon, Cincinnati Post
  • Dick Rosetta, Salt Lake City Tribune
  • Bob Hurt, Arizona Republic
  • Bob Hentzen, Topeka Capital-Journal

 

 

 

 

Digital Postcard No. 8: The FWAA’s 1982 All-America Team

Ed. Note: This is the eighth in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.) 

In 1982….Chariots of Fire won Best Picture…The first CD (Compact Disc) was produced in Germany…Disney World opened in Orlando…Michael Jackson released the Thriller album…U.S. Postage Stamps cost 20 cents each…Country Western singing star LeAnn Rimes was born.

Nebraska center Dave Rimington became the first person to win the Outland Trophy for a second straight year and 37 years later is still the only one to do so.  He anchored an FWAA All-America Team line that featured a dream backfield of Eric Dickerson (SMU), Mike Rozier (Nebraska) and Herschel Walker (Georgia).  Toss in Stanford’s John Elway at quarterback and wide receiver Anthony Carter (wide receiver) and BYU’s Gordon Hudson (tight end), and it would have been quite a formidable offensive team if it took the field.  A total of 11 future College Football Hall of Famers were on this FWAA team, including six on the defensive side of the ball with William Fuller (North Carolina) and Wilbur Marshall (Florida) as notables. Joe Paterno of Penn State was the FWAA Coach of the Year for the second time in five years.

Herschel Walker Clip:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wvf6Bpq7OH4

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

SMU defeated Pittsburgh, 7-3, in the Jan. 1, 1983 bowl. SMU’s FWAA All-America Eric Dickerson rushed for 124 yards as the Mustangs completed their first undefeated season since 1947.  SMU scored in the fourth quarter for the victory. But Penn State swept the major polls as national champion.

SMU’s Cotton Bowl victory:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rVOu0zwLDc

Your 1982 FWAA Selectors

  • Bob Smizik, Pittsburgh Press
  • Dan Foster, Greenville News
  • Bill Lumpkin, Birmingham Post-Herald
  • Jack Gallagher, Houston Post
  • Bob Hentzen, Topeka Capital-Journal
  • John Bansch, Indianapolis Star
  • Marion Dunn, Provo Daily Herald
  • Georg   N. Meyers, Seattle Times
  • Jack Hairston, Gainesville Sun

 

 

 

 

Digital Postcard No. 7: The FWAA’s 1976 All-America Team

(Ed. Note: This is the seventh in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.) 

In 1976, after 45 years of coaching, Paul Brown announced his retirement from the NFL…Ted Turner purchased the Atlanta Braves for a reported $12 million. … C.W. McCall’s song “Convoy” hit No. 1 on the country music charts. … Jack Nicholson won a Golden Globe Award for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” … TV comedy “Laverne and Shirley” premiered. … Jockey Bill Shoemaker won his 7,000th race. … Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs founded Apple Computers in the garage of Jobs’ parents. … The movie “All the President’s Men” was released. … Hank Aaron hit his 755th and final homer off Dick Drago of the Angels. … Outbreak of “Legionnaire’s Disease” kills 29 in Philadelphia. … Chicago White Sox suited up in shorts.

Heisman Trophy-winning running back Tony Dorsett led Pittsburgh to the national championship. … Quarterback Matt Cavanaugh and a stubborn Pitt defense dominated fifth-ranked Georgia, 27-3, in the Sugar Bowl to stake the claim to the FWAA’s Grantland Rice Trophy (national title). … USC landed three players on the FWAA All-American team – running back Ricky Bell, defensive lineman Gary Jeter and defensive back Dennis Thurman. … Notre Dame defensive lineman Ross Browner won the Outland Trophy. … Prominent names on the All-American team included quarterback Gifford Nielson (BYU), tight end Ken MacAfee (Notre Dame), kicker Tony Franklin (Texas A&M) and punter Russell Erxleben (Texas).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pL6d6zxdQxg – Dorsett

Go to http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/allamerica/alltime.pdf to see the entire list.

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

In its first season in the Southwest Conference, Houston was able to grab a share of the league title, play in a major bowl game and beat an undefeated team (Maryland) from the Atlantic Coast Conference, 30-21. Running back Alois Blackwell ran for 149 yards and two first-quarter touchdowns to lead the Cougars. Houston, under coach Bill Yeoman, had a 21-0 lead after 15 minutes and never let the Terrapins get within serious striking distance.

1976 FWAA Selectors

  • Cooper Rollow, Chicago Tribune
  • Norman Miller, New York Daily News
  • Charles Karmosky. Newport News Daily Press
  • John Mooney, Salt Lake Tribune
  • Bob Galt, Dallas Times Herald
  • Roy Edwards, Memphis Commercial Appeal
  • Joe McGuff, Kansas City Star
  • Earl Luebker, Tacoma News Tribune
  • Regis McAuley, Tucson Daily Citizen.

 

 

Digital Postcard No. 6: The FWAA’s 1973 All-America Team

(Ed. Note: This is the sixth in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.) 

In 1973, Spiro Agnew resigned as Vice President under Richard Nixon…Cost of a gallon of gas was 40 cents…A bill to allow the construction of the Alaska Oil Pipeline was passed…The classic movie “American Graffiti” premiered…The court case Roe vs. Wade made abortion a U.S. constitutional right…The Sears Tower in Chicago was completed…Billie Jean King beat Bobby Riggs 6-4, 6-3, 6-3 in “The Battle of the Sexes”…U.S. troops were withdrawn from Vietnam…Watergate hearings began…Secretariat became the first Triple Crown winner in 25 years…Elvis Presley’s “Aloha from Hawaii” TV special seen by more than 1 billion viewers.

After five lead changes, Bob Thomas kicked a 19-yard field goal in the final minutes to give Notre Dame a 24-23 Sugar Bowl victory over Alabama and the national championship…The Irish were represented on the All-American team by tight end Dave Casper and defensive back Mike Townsend. The Crimson Tide had offensive lineman Buddy Brown and linebacker Woodrow Lowe…Penn State running back John Cappelletti was the Heisman Trophy winner and John Hicks of Ohio State won the Outland Trophy… Pittsburgh’s Johnny Majors was the FWAA Coach of the Year…There were plenty of impressive names on the FWAA All-American team, including quarterback Danny White (Arizona State), running backs Kermit Johnson (UCLA) and Roosevelt Leaks (Texas), receiver Lynn Swann (USC), defensive lineman Lucius Selmon (Oklahoma) and linebacker Randy Gradishar (Ohio State).

Go to http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/allamerica/alltime.pdf to see the entire list.

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

Nebraska coach Tom Osborne earned his first bowl triumph with a convincing 19-3 verdict over eighth-ranked Texas, which made its sixth consecutive Cotton Bowl appearance. The Longhorns were held to just 196 yards of total offense. After kicking a first-quarter field goal to start the scoring, Texas was blanked the rest of the way. Tony Davis rushed for 106 yards and a touchdown to lead Nebraska.

1973 FWAA Selectors

  • Steve Weller, Buffalo Evening News
  • Bob Galt, Dallas Times Herald
  • Whitey Kelley, Charlotte Observer
  • John Mooney, Salt Lake Tribune
  • Earl Luebker, Tacoma News-Tribune
  • Bob Collins, Indianapolis Star
  • Alf Van Hoose, Birmingham News
  • Del Black, Kansas City Star

Digital Postcard No. 5: The FWAA’s 1970 All-America Team

(Ed. Note: This is the fifth in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.)  

 

 

In 1970, the soap opera “All My Children” debuted on Jan. 5 on ABC…  Farmers sued Max Yasgur for $35,000 in damages caused in “Woodstock” … Curt Flood files a lawsuit challenging baseball’s reserve clause … The movie “M*A*S*H” starring Donald Sullivan and Elliott Gould is released … Arthur Ashe won the Australian Open … Pete Maravich becomes the first to score 3,000 points in college basketball – without the 3-point line … a U.S. postage stamp costs 6 cents … The Beatles disband … Apollo 13 crew survives an accident in space and splashes down on April 17.

Airplane crashes involving players, coaches and administrators from Marshall and Wichita State football teams marred this season … This was the first season schools were allowed to schedule 11 regular season games … Joe Theismann threw for over 500 yards in a hard rain, but Notre Dame lost for the first time in the final game of the regular season, 38-28, to USC … The No. 6 Irish beat No. 1 Texas in the Cotton Bowl, and No. 2 Ohio State lost to Stanford (and Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Jim Plunkett) in the Rose Bowl. That set up No. 3 Nebraska to beat No. 5 LSU in the Orange Bowl to win the national title … Ohio State’s Jim Stillwagon won the Outland Trophy … Big-name FWAA All-Americans included Dan Dierdorf (Michigan), Tom Gatewood (Notre Dame), Jack Youngblood (Florida), Jack Ham (Penn State) and John Tatum (Ohio State) … Northwestern’s 6-4 record (6-1 in Big Ten) earned Alex Agase  FWAA Coach of the Year honors.

Go to http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/allamerica/alltime.pdf to see the entire list.
Bob Hope Video of the 1970 team: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1S_D0TUGcc

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

Top-ranked Texas fumbled nine times, losing five, and Notre Dame ended UT’s bid for a national title – along with the Longhorns’ 30-game winning streak – with a 24-11 payback victory. All the scoring was done in the first half. Texas’ All-American running back Steve Worster was limited to 42 yards on 16 carries. Quarterback Eddie Phillips did the most damage, rushing for 164 yards on 23 carries and throwing for 199 (9 of 17). ND’s Joe Theismann threw for a TD (26 yards to Tom Gatewood) and ran for two (15 and 3 yards).

1970 FWAA Selectors

  • Steve Weller, Buffalo Evening News
  • George McClelland, Norfolk Virginian-Pilot
  • Tom McEwen, Tampa Tribune
  • Si Burick, Dayton News
  • Volney Meece, Daily Oklahoman
  • Burle Petitt, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
  • Don Fair, Seattle Post-Intelligencer
  • Carl Porter, Tucson Daily Citizen

Digital Postcard No. 4: The FWAA’s 1969 All-America Team

(Ed. Note: This is the fourth in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.)  

In 1969, the Chicago Cubs blew a nine-game lead in the final two months of the season and lost the National League pennant to the New York Mets … Neil Armstrong (the astronaut, not the former Chicago Bears coach) had a better year than Cubs manager Leo Durocher when he became the first person to step on the moon on July 21 … Woodstock Music and Art Fair was held on Max Yasgur’s Dairy Farm in New York State … John Wayne won his only Academy Award for his portrayal of U.S. Marshal Rooster Cogburn in “True Grit.”

With President Richard Nixon in attendance, top-ranked Texas came from behind to beat No. 2 Arkansas, 15-14, in a battle of unbeatens in the regular season … Notre Dame made its first bowl appearance in 45 years, losing to the Longhorns, 21-17, in the Cotton Bowl, giving Texas the national title … Oklahoma halfback Steve Owens won the Heisman Trophy … Michigan finished 8-3, lost 10-3 to USC in the Rose Bowl, and Bo Schembechler in his first season with the Wolverines  was chosen as the FWAA’s Coach of the Year … Purdue’s Mike Phipps was the All-America quarterback … Other notables were Jim Otis (Ohio State), John Tatum (Ohio State) and Mike McCoy (Notre Dame).

Go to http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/allamerica/alltime.pdf to see the entire list.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FszLa0AhBxI

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

Steve Worster, an All-American in Texas’ Wishbone offense, rushed for 155 yards on 20 carries and Texas came back from deficits of 10-0 and 17-14 to capture the national title with a 21-17 victory over Notre Dame. FWAA All-American offensive lineman Bob McKay helped that Longhorn attack function. Joe Theismann threw for 231 yards (17 of 27, 2 interceptions, 2 touchdowns) for the Irish.

1969 FWAA Selectors

  • Joe Concannon, Boston Globe
  • Bob Hurt, Daily Oklahoman
  • Edgar Allen, Nashville Banner
  • Bob Pille, Chicago Sun-Times
  • Dave Campbell, Waco News-Tribune
  • Paul Zimmerman, Los Angeles Times
  • Dick Herbert, Raleigh News & Observer

 

Digital Postcard No. 3: The FWAA’s 1965 All-America Team

In 1965, “My Fair Lady” starring Rex Harrison won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture … Julie Andrews won Best Actress honors for her performance in “Mary Poppins” … The Astrodome, the “Eighth Wonder of the World”, opened … The World’s Fair was held in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. It closed in the fall after having financial problems … Sandy Koufax pitched a perfect game against the Cubs … Gas went up to 31 cents a gallon, but bread was steady at 21 cents a loaf.

For the first time, all the final college football polls were released after the bowl games were played. Good thing. Michigan State, Arkansas and Nebraska all finished the regular season 10-0. All three lost bowl games, with Alabama beating the Cornhuskers. Alabama was the Associated Press (writers) No. 1 team. Michigan State won the United Press International (coaches) vote. The two shared the FWAA vote. USC halfback Mike Garrett was the Heisman Trophy winner, and Tommy Nobis from Texas claimed the Outland Trophy. Plenty of big names dotted the 1965 FWAA All-America team: Steve Spurrier (Florida), Johnny Roland (Missouri), Floyd Little (Syracuse), Clinton Jones (Michigan State), Jim Grabowski (Illinois) and Donny Anderson (Texas Tech).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjhTQx9C_SI

COTTON BOWL NUGGET

With an opportunity to win the national championship, unbeaten Arkansas was a heavy favorite over a 7- 3 LSU team. Joe Labruzzo, who rushed for 69 yards on 21 carries, scored both Tiger touchdowns in the second quarter. LSU’s defense buckled down and shut out the Razorbacks in the second half to complete the stunning 14-7 upset. Arkansas’ 22-game winning streak came to an end on the first day of 1966 in the Cotton Bowl.

1965 FWAA Selectors

Bob Hoobing, Associated Press (Boston)

Smith Barrier, Greensboro Daily News

Jesse Outlar, Atlanta Constitution

Bob Broeg, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Si Burrick, Dayton News

Jim Scott, Berkeley Gazette

Mickey Herskowitz, Houston Post

 

 

Digital Postcard No. 2: The FWAA’s 1956 All-America Team

1956

(Ed. Note: This is the second in the series of digital postcards commemorating 75 years of the FWAA All-America Team.  The first FWAA All-America Team was published in 1944 during World War II and is the second longest continuously published team in major-college football.)  

In 1956, milk was selling for 97 cents a gallon…The stock market rose to 499…The minimum wage topped out at $1 an hour…With Charlton Heston cast as Moses, the movie Ten Commandments premiered on Oct. 5…. RCA sold 90,000 color television sets…Elvis Presley recorded his first pop single, Heartbreak Hotel…. And smash hit My Fair Lady opened on Broadway.

The FWAA All-America Committee also released a team packed with stars, including Iowa tackle Alex Karras, who later would star on television and in the movies after a professional football career. Ohio State lineman Jim Parker won the Outland Trophy in 1956, but Karras would take it a year later. The 1956 FWAA team included eight backs and six of them would go on to careers worthy of being elected into the College Football Hall of Fame: John Brodie (Stanford), Jim Brown (Syracuse), Paul Hornung (Notre Dame), Johnny Majors (Tennessee), Tommy McDonald (Oklahoma) and Jack Pardee (Texas A&M).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8Z78Osxp_Q

Hornung claimed the Heisman Trophy that season (1,066 votes) in a close vote over second-place Majors (994 votes) and third-place McDonald (973) despite the fact Notre Dame finished with a losing record (2-8). Hornung is still the only Heisman Trophy winner to play on a losing team the year he won the award.

The national team of the year, however, was McDonald’s Sooners, who were on the way to a 47-game winning streak under Coach Bud Wilkinson that wouldn’t end until 1957. FWAA All-America center Jerry Tubbs was a stalwart on that powerhouse Oklahoma team that claimed the FWAA’s Grantland Rice Trophy, symbolic of the national title, for a second straight season.

Go to http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/allamerica/alltime.pdf to see the entire list.

The Cotton Bowl Tie:  Syracuse’s Jim Brown would be the featured back in the Cotton Bowl on Jan. 1, 1957. He nearly put the Orangemen in the win column. He rushed for 132 yards and scored three touchdowns, but TCU prevailed, 28-27. Brown was named one of the two Most Outstanding Players in the game along with TCU tackle Norman Hamilton, another FWAA All-America that season.

Your 1956 FWAA All-America Team Selectors:
Joe Sheehan, New York Times
Furman Bisher, Atlanta Journal
Jack Horner, Durham Herald
Jack Clowser, Cleveland Press
Volney Meece, Oklahoma City Oklahoman
Flem Hall, Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Bill Leiser, San Francisco Chronicle