New book from the National Football Foundation features Q&As with 12 College Football Hall of Fame coaches

IRVING, Texas – The National Football Foundation (NFF) & College Football Hall of Fame proudly announces the release of their exciting new book, Lessons from Legends: 12 Hall of Fame Coaches on Leadership, Life, and Leaving a Legacy. The book is available now and can be purchased by clicking here.

Lessons from Legends may be the greatest collection of college football knowledge ever assembled. With over 260 years, 2,100 wins, 95 conference titles and 13 National Championships of combined coaching experience, any football fan, coach or player can learn from the wealth of wisdom contained in these pages.

“We are extremely excited about this book, featuring some of the greatest Hall of Fame coaches of all time,” said NFF President & CEO Steve Hatchell. “To coaches, both young and old, this book is a valuable asset on how to mold our next generation of leaders. And to all others, the lessons these coaches imparted on their players can easily translate to everyday life.”

 The book features Q&As with 12 College Football Hall of Fame coaches as they discuss their careers, the lessons they learned and specific features or topics that marked their careers.

In these pages you will learn how:

  • Tom Osborne and Barry Switzer won year after year.
  • Barry Alvarez turned Wisconsin into a perennial winner.
  • R.C. Slocum treated players the right way.
  • Terry Donahue kept his players from distractions in Los Angeles.
  • Steve Spurrier did things as only Steve Spurrier could.

These lessons and more from Mike Bellotti, Marino Casem, Fisher DeBerry, Vince Dooley, Phillip Fulmer and Frank Girardi are featured in the book.

“A good coach doesn’t just coach his players for four years and let them go,” said former Oklahoma head coach Bob Stoops in the book’s foreword. “He is a coach and mentor for life. The most important thing a coach does has nothing to do with teaching a kid how to properly tackle. It’s teaching a kid how to be an adult.”

With quotes from College Football Hall of Famers Troy Aikman, Peyton Manning and Danny Wuerffel, and from Washington head coach Chris Petersen, this book has an unmatched combination of football talent.

INTERVIEW & BOOK REQUESTS: Phil Marwill, pmarwill@footballfoundation.com

ABOUT THE BOOK: Football Matters Publishing

ISBN: 978-0-692-94767-8

Praise for the Coaches

Barry Alvarez

“I learned a lot of great lessons from Coach Alvarez, but there are two that are by far the best to me. First, don’t flinch. A lot of people in life, when they’re faced with a moment of adversity, tend to flinch and redefine themselves by trying to overthink the situation. Your first and initial reaction is always the best. The second lesson was to enjoy every win. I don’t care if it’s over the No. 1 team in the nation or an FCS opponent, you need to enjoy every one of them fully.”

Bret Bielema, Arkansas Head Coach and former Wisconsin assistant under Alvarez

 Tom Osborne

 “It was an incredible honor to play for and be coached by Tom Osborne. Coach taught us about teamwork and the value of ‘unity of purpose.’ Each person connected to the program was valued and played an important role in the overall success of Nebraska football. We also learned about the importance of being a great student and how to be an active participant in the community. We learned to respect the game, to honor those who came before us by our work ethic, and by our habits. In short, we participated in a lot more than wins and losses- we learned how to become leaders. I could not be more proud to say that Tom Osborne was my Coach.”

Trev Alberts, Nebraska Omaha Athletics Director, Nebraska LB; Butkus Award, Lambert Trophy Winner; College Football Hall of Famer

Barry Switzer

“Coach Switzer had a way of motivating his players to perform. At a time when most coaches rule with an iron hand or fear, Coach Switzer used positive reinforcement and that made all the difference.”

Keith Jackson, Oklahoma TE, 6X Pro Bowler, Super Bowl Champion, College Football Hall of Famer

Fisher DeBerry

“I was a part of Coach DeBerry’s first freshmen class when he got the head coaching job at the Air Force Academy. From Day One you could tell he was a man of purpose and passion. He was the ideal person for the unique and challenging position as a coach at a service academy.

His win-loss record speaks for itself, but what truly defines Coach DeBerry is that intangible metric that the majority of his players knew and felt – that he positively cared for them. It’s now over 30 years later, and I am still honored to call him ‘coach.’”

Chad Hennings, Air Force DT, Outland Trophy Winner, US Air Force Captain, 3X Super Bowl Champion, College Football Hall of Famer

Phillip Fulmer

“It was an honor and privilege to play for Coach Fulmer. From the first time I met him in December of 1993, when he came to my home, I felt very comfortable talking to him. A significant part of my decision to stay my fourth year was because I wanted to play for Coach Fulmer another year. I learned a lot about football from Coach Fulmer; he had great insight into all phases of the game.

“Most importantly though, I am thankful for his friendship. The times that we are together on trips, having dinner, playing golf, or hunting are times I truly cherish, and I value his friendship; it means a great deal to me.”

Peyton Manning, Tennessee QB; William V. Campbell Trophy®, Maxwell Award Winner; 2X Super Bowl Champion, 5X NFL MVP, NFL All-Time Passing Yards and TD Record Holder, College Football Hall of Famer

R.C. Slocum

“Coach taught me some of the most important virtues as a young man. He taught us to do the right thing all the time and not just some of the time. If you cut corners, more than likely it will catch up to you. He also instilled in me about respecting others. He preached often about the Golden Rule, treat others like you would like to be treated.”

Dat Nguyen, Texas A&M LB; Lombardi, Bednarik, Lambert Trophy Winner; College Football Hall of Famer

Vince Dooley

“The smartest decision I ever made was to play for Coach Dooley at the University of Georgia. His honesty and integrity exhibited during the recruiting process [when I was] in high school when we met has never wavered. He made no promises, but offered the opportunity to play the game. I would not be in the College Football Hall of Fame if not for Vince Dooley. We aspire to live up to standards of those we admire and respect. His legacy lives in the generations of players that proudly say, ‘I played for Coach Vince Dooley.’”

Scott Woerner, Georgia DB, College Football Hall of Famer

Terry Donahue

“I give Coach Donahue a lot of credit for my success. He was such a great example for those he coached. He carried himself with class and integrity and always taught us to keep things in the proper perspective. He was tough on me, but he was always honest and I respected that. I became a better player and person because I played for Coach Donahue.”

Troy Aikman, UCLA QB, Davey O’Brien Award Winner, 3X Super Bowl Champion, Super Bowl MVP, 6X Pro Bowler, College and Pro Football Hall of Famer

Frank Girardi

“Coach Girardi is at the top of my list as far as positive influences in my life. It went well beyond the football field. I always remember the first meeting we had when he became Head Coach and how he stressed loyalty. That was a great message that meant a lot to me. It was more than that, though. He stressed discipline and hard work every day in practice and he rewarded hard work.”

Hon. Thomas I. Vanaskie, Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, Lycoming College DB, All-American

Marino Casem

“I went from being a mediocre student to making the Dean’s List twice. I have Coach Casem to thank for that because I really needed someone as demanding as him to grab my attention. Because of his no-nonsense approach, I had to change internally. He made you pay the price if you tried to cut corners. I can honestly say today that I truly love and respect the man because the pressure he constantly put me under brought greatness out of me. I couldn’t have brought that out myself.”

Roynell Young, Alcorn State DB, NFL Pro Bowler

Mike Bellotti

“He had a great feel for people. I was always impressed with the staff that he would hire because you could learn as much from all of the assistants as you could from him. Coach Bellotti was always genuine, authentic and approachable. You could talk about anything with him, and he made the whole environment a good one. He’s a really good guy, not to mention a really good football coach.”

– Chris Petersen, Washington Head Coach and former assistant under Bellotti at Oregon

Steve Spurrier

“Playing for Coach Spurrier changed the trajectory of my life. He had a combination of two seemingly contradictory qualities: he was the most detail-oriented, somewhat perfectionistic coach I’ve ever had, and he had an extremely flexible part of himself that would constantly explore better options and make on-the-spot adjustments that would take weeks for other coaches to consider.”

Danny Wuerffel, Florida QB; Heisman Trophy, William V. Campbell Trophy®, Maxwell Award, Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, Walter Camp Award, Davey O’Brien Award, Sammy Baugh Trophy Winner; College Football Hall of Famer

ABOUT THE AUTHOR – SCOTT BEDGOOD

Scott Bedgood has interviewed Hall of Famers, Emmy and Grammy award winners, Guinness World Record Holders, adventurers, and entrepreneurs in his journalism career. A sportswriter since he was 15-years-old working for the Tyler Morning Telegraph in Tyler, Texas, Bedgood attended the University of Oklahoma where his passion for college football compelled him to pursue a career covering the sport. Scott began covering college football after graduating and moving to Dallas where he lives with his wife Samantha. His other work can be found on his website www.scottbedgood.com. Bedgood can be reached at scott@archervision.com.

 ABOUT The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame

Founded in 1947 with early leadership from General Douglas MacArthur, legendary Army coach Earl “Red” Blaik and immortal journalist Grantland Rice, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame is a non-profit educational organization that runs programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in young people. With 120 chapters and 12,000 members nationwide, NFF programs include FootballMatters.org, the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta, The William V. Campbell Trophy presented by Fidelity Investments, annual scholarships of more than $1.3 million and a series of initiatives to honor the legends of the past and inspire the leaders of the future. NFF corporate partners include Delta Air Lines, Fidelity Investments, Herff Jones, New York Athletic Club, Pasadena Tournament of Roses, PrimeSport, the Sports Business Journal, Under Armour and VICIS. Learn more at www.footballfoundation.org.

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Plati’s streak coming to an end at 410 football games

Dave Plati, Colorado’s associate athletic director/sports information, is a long-time FWAA member. Under his leadership. Colorado has claimed an FWAA Super 11 Award, given to the top SID departments in FBS, four times during the eight years of the award’s existence.   Dave shared this bit of personal news on Friday:

“Many of you who know me know that for the last decade or so, I’ve been dealing with some circulation issues in my left leg; the swelling at times makes it look like a Hawaiian banyan tree.  Recently, it developed some complications and it’s being treated accordingly (I’ll be fine); but its condition at present is enough to make travel especially hard, thus ending a personal streak I have taken great pride in: starting on Nov. 19, 1983, I have attended and worked every Colorado football game —all 410, beginning with a 38-21 win over Kansas State to close the ’83 season up to last Saturday’s Arizona game.

(I wasn’t overly keen on doing this, but our CUBuffs.com contributing editor, Neill Woelk, told me it was necessary to write something, or he’d write a news story and post it himself, with made-up quotes from me — though he said “I’d be surprised at what I said.”)

100 Things Oklahoma State Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die

A new book by long-time FWAA member Robert Allen.

Few college towns can match the history and loyal fan base of Oklahoma State. With a total of 52 NCAA Championships for the school, Cowboys fans are no strangers to winning and have a lot of history to look back on. In 2017, they have even more to look forward to.

In 100 Things Oklahoma State Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die (Triumph Books, September 2017), sideline voice of the Cowboy Radio Network Robert Allen combines his encyclopedic knowledge and passion for all things sports to produce the ultimate guide to Oklahoma State fandom.  From football and basketball to golf and baseball, this great new reference title covers 10 sports and has something for fans of every era. Highlights include:

A heartfelt foreword from Head Football Coach Mike Gundy

Profiles of fan-favorites Bob Kurland, Eddie Sutton, Rickie Fowler and many more

History of their various stadiums and arenas including Boone Pickens Stadium and Gallagher-Iba Arena

Stories about go-to stops including Chris’ University Spirit, Hideaway Pizza, Eskimo Joe’s and more.

100 Things Oklahoma State Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die provides a thorough, easy to follow guide to becoming the best fan possible. Loaded with trivia, facts and anecdotes about the biggest players and personalities in the school’s history, this great new title covers the entire Oklahoma State experience. No fan’s library is complete without it.

About the Author:

Robert Allen is the sideline voice of the Cowboy Radio Network, hosts “Robert Allen & Friends” on Triple Play Sports Radio and covers Oklahoma State sports for Go Pokes. A graduate of OSU, Allen co-authored More Than a Championship: The 2011 Oklahoma State Cowboys with coach Mike Gundy. He and his wife, Lynne, have two kids (Zach & Katy) and live in Edmond, Oklahoma.

For More Information:

Contact: Stefani Szenda, Triumph Books, 312.676.4224, x324s.szenda@triumphbooks.com..

 

 

FWAA member and Austin radio personality Sean Adams dies

Sean Adams, a business-trained, California-born athlete and FWAA member who transformed himself into a motivational speaker and one of Austin’s most unique, unstoppable sports radio voices, died Thursday after an apparent heart attack. He was 46.

There was a moment of silence before the Texas-USC game on Saturday night at The Coliseum in Los Angeles, and his seat in the pressbox was left vacant.

Below is a photo from John Bianco,  senior associate athletics director for football media relations, of Adams’ seat, and CLICK HERE to read the Austin American-Statesman’s story about his death.

From John Bianco: “Have a heavy heart on this game day. Thank you USC for the tribute to our friend Sean Adams. Thoughts and prayers are with his family & friends.‬ #RIP”

Barnhart joins TMGcollegesports.com

From TMGcollegesports.com

The second season of TMGcollegesports.com got a major jolt of adrenaline in August with the addition of Tony Barnhart, aka Mr. College Football, who agreed to become the fourth member of the band.

TMG, a subscription website dedicated to college football with side trips to all other sports, was founded in July of 2016 by three veteran scribes: Chris Dufresne, Mark Blaudschun and Herb Gould.

“I am more than thrilled to be working, not just with great writers, but with great friends,” Barnhart said of joining TMG. “I am honored to be a part of it.”

The addition of Barnhart gives TMG more than 150 combined years of journalism experience. Barnhart, Blaudschun and Dufresne are also all former FWAA Presidents.

Barnhart, who spent the bulk of his newspaper days at the Atlanta-Journal Constitution, is a multi-platform performer who is still heavily involved with the SEC Network and remains a highly-sought speaker on the Southern “talking season” circuit.

TMG just keeps growing. We added a regular weekly podcast this year and also a “Guest Lecturer” series with contributions (so far) from grizzled vets Tom Luicci and Wendell Barnhouse.

We think TMG is the best subscription bargain out there with a special “professional” rate for FWAA members at only $14.95 per year.

TMG: For more than the score.

2017 FWAA Best Writing Contest winners announced

DALLAS — Three writers — Alex Scarborough and Jake Trotter of ESPN.com and Dennis Dodd of CBS Sports — each claimed two individual awards and Glenn Guilbeau of USA TODAY Network/Gannett Louisiana repeated as a first-place winner in the 25th Annual FWAA Best Writing Contest.

ESPN.com writers collected 10 individual or co-bylined awards, including 1-2-3 sweeps in the Game Story and Enterprise categories.

First-place winners will receive game balls, certificates and cash prizes. Second and third-place winners will get certificates and cash prizes. Honorable mention award recipients will receive certificates. All will be recognized at the annual FWAA Awards Breakfast on Jan. 8, 2018 in Atlanta.

GAME

First Place — Andrea Adelson, ESPN.com

Second Place — Alex Scarborough, ESPN.com

Third Place — Jake Trotter, ESPN.com

Honorable Mention — John Feinstein, Washington Post; Dennis Dodd, CBS Sports; Matt Fortuna, ESPN.com; Rich Scarcella, Reading Eagle

FEATURES

First Place —  John Crist, Saturday Down South

Second Place — Mike Vorel, South Bend (Ind.) Tribune

Third Place —  Nate Mink, The Post-Standard (Syracuse, N.Y.)/Syracuse.com

Honorable Mention —  Alex Scarborough, ESPN.com; Jake Trotter, ESPN.com;  Daniel Uthman, USA TODAY

COLUMNS

First Place — Glenn Guilbeau, USA TODAY Network/Gannett Louisiana

Second Place — J.P. Scott, Athlon Sports

Third Place — Ryan McGee, ESPN.com

Honorable Mention — Matt Hayes, Bleacher Report; Ivan Maisel, ESPN.com

ENTERPRISE

First Place — David Ching, ESPN.com

Second Place — Mark Schlabach and Paula Lavigne, ESPN.com

Third Place — Kyle Bonagura and Mark Fainaru-Wada, ESPN.com

Honorable Mention — Harry B. Minium Jr., Norfolk Virginian-Pilot; Dennis Dodd, CBS Sports; Pete Thamel, Sports Illustrated; Michael Casagrande,  AL.com/Alabama Media Group; Jack Ebling and Joe Rexrode, Dog Ear Publishing; Andrew Greif, The Oregonian

FWAA VP Fortuna explains decision to go all in on The All-American

By Matt Fortuna of The All-American

FWAA Second Vice President

I had just gotten back from a Cape Cod getaway in July when my phone rang.

It was Stewart Mandel. You fellow college football writers may have heard of him.

He asked me if I had ever read The Athletic. In fact, I was already a Chicago site subscriber.

You can imagine, then, how his pitch to me about The Athletic’s college football vertical, The All-American, ended up going:

Short and sweet. As in, barely even necessary. 

I was all in. Allow me tell you why.

Like so many in this business — and especially on the college football beat — Stew and I had seen our jobs eliminated from our respective companies within the past year. Though I had been making a decent go of it as a freelancer, I, like many, wondered where all this was possibly leading.

Writing about sports was still the dream, yes, but what was the end game when it came to employment? So many reporters I looked up to had been cast aside as companies “pivoted to video” or prioritized sensationalism over substance.

The more I stepped back to canvass the landscape, the harder it was to find a place doing anything sustainable that I truly wanted to be a part of. So the day I got back from that vacation, I began to bargain with myself: Should I just get through this upcoming season by writing as much as absolutely possible, for as many outlets as possible, since there’s a decent chance that this might be it for me, at least as a full-time venture?

I had already inquired about multiple different paths (teaching, coaching, P.R.) with multiple different schools (grammar, high school), all in the hopes of giving myself a potential safety net should this broken model of journalism continue down its troubling path.

And then, in a poetic bit of timing, Stew called, telling me one of my favorite local sites’ plans for expanding its reach nationally. His pitch to me then is now my pitch to you, the readers and fellow writers wondering why you should pay to read about college football:

  • This subscription model allows us to devote all of our time and energy to strong written content. 
  • There are no ads. There are no auto-play videos. There is no clickbait. Our co-founders, Adam Hansmann and Alex Mather, have made this as clean and as easy of a reading experience as anyone could imagine, eliminating the stresses that come from the various gimmicks out there that slow your computer or phone.
  • Last, but not least: The Team, The Team, The Team. We brought aboard a pair of my former ESPN.com colleagues in Chantel Jennings and Max Olson. We landed Nicole Auerbach from USA Today and Chris Vannini from CoachingSearch.com. Oh, we also added the reigning Steve Ellis/FWAA Beat Writer of the Year, Jason Kersey, from SECCountry.com. And, in addition to Stew, we have managing editor Dan Uthman running the operation, something he did magnificently before at USA Today.

The best part of all of this? It’s almost time to launch. We go live this Monday, Aug. 28. Subscriptions to The Athletic will start at less than $5 a month and afford you access to not just our site but Ken Rosenthal for baseball, Seth Davis for college basketball and numerous local markets.

That means for a cup of coffee a month, you’ll get daily coverage from an eight-member, deep-sourced team spread across every region of the country. We’ve all been traveling the nation during camp to make sure you have quality content to read from Day 1. In those travels, we’ve been overwhelmed by the positive responses from coaches, SIDs and fans everywhere excited for this thing to take off.

We hope that they, and you, take the pledge and subscribe to The All-American.

It’s a much different kind of bargain — one that is too good to pass up.

Books: Dave Matter on Gary Pinkel

FWAA member Dave Matter from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch is the author on a new book about recently retired Gary Pinkel, the winningest coach in Missouri football history. 

Book blurb: “Very few college football coaches earn the distinction of becoming their programs’ winningest, but Gary Pinkel has done it twice. From his nine-year tenure at the University of Toledo to his career at the University of Missouri from 2001 to 2015, Pinkel has shown he has the talent and meddle to take his teams to the top.  These remarkable achievements have been met by challenges along the way in Pinkel’s personal and professional life, including a DUI and a divorce, a threatened team boycott at Mizzou which dominated national news headlines, and ultimately, a decision to step away from it all following a diagnosis of non-Hodgkins lymphoma.  In The 100-Yard Journey, Pinkel offers a glimpse into the mind of a winner as well as an honest reflection on meeting and overcoming the unexpected. Follow along from the start of Pinkel’s coaching career at Kent State, the same program for which he played as a tight end, through stops at Washington and Toledo, and finally, taking over at the helm of Missouri, a program he guided to 10 bowl games in 15 years, a No. 1 AP ranking at the end of the 2007 season, and SEC Coach of the Year honors in 2014. Whether you’re a Tigers fan or just interested in what makes a successful head coach tick, anyone can find something to relate to in Pinkel’s personal memoirs.”

To order Dave’s book, CLICK HERE to go to Triumph Books.

 

Gina Lehe named one of SportsBusiness Journal’s 2017 Game Changers 1

IRVING, Texas – Gina Lehe, senior director of communications and brand management for the College Football Playoff and a member of the Football Writers Association of America, has been named to the SportsBusiness Journal (SBJ) Game Changers: Women in Sports Business, CFP Executive Director Bill Hancock said.

An annual SBJ edition, Game Changers profiles women in the industry who have played key roles in their respective fields. The 2017 class features 35 women executives who have brought new approaches and ideas to sports business, have been out front on significant projects and programs and are making critical decisions that help shape companies and organizations for the future.

“It’s great that someone else has recognized what those of us in the college football family have known for a long time—that Gina is a wonderful professional and an exceptional leader,” Hancock said.

In its first three years, Lehe has helped catapult the CFP to national prominence, developing and launching the organization’s brand strategy. From its visual and textual identity to large format branding, including all collateral and supporting logo marks. In addition to traditional media services, operations and logistics, Lehe also oversees the CFP social and digital media strategy. Under her guidance, the official CFP social platforms have seen tremendous growth, including year-over-year increases in engagement, reach and impressions. She works closely with the ESPN production team and talent and serves on the senior staff supporting the CFP Selection Committee.

Prior to joining the CFP staff in 2014, Lehe spent 16 years working in the college football bowl industry, most recently as Director of Media for the Rose Bowl Game. In 2007, she became the first woman to lead media and communications for a national championship game. Lehe served in similar capacities for the Insight Bowl (now Cactus Bowl) and Fiesta Bowl.

Lehe is a member of the Association for Women in Sports Media (AWSM), College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and National Football Foundation (NFF). She also serves on the steering committee for Sports PR Summit. Lehe graduated from the University of Arizona with a bachelor of arts in communications. Originally from Pacific Grove, California, she is married to husband, Adam. The Lehes have a daughter, Adriana, and are expecting a second daughter this September.

The recipient class will be celebrated in New York on Thursday, September 14, at the 5th annual Game Changers: Women in Sports Business Conference. To view the full list of honorees, www.sportsbusinessdaily.com.

A Special Message Regarding Safety Concerns for Media Parking

From CFP, FWAA, CoSIDA and USBWA

On behalf of the FWAA, CFP, CoSIDA and the USBWA, we are writing to make you aware of growing concerns related to media parking locations for football and basketball events and how their placements pose potential safety risks for credentialed media representatives in a working capacity and having to exit facilities during late night hours.

While distance and darkness can pose safety problems for anyone, this is of particular concern for the growing number of female reporters who are departing football press boxes or basketball arenas in late night hours.

Several examples around the country this year have been registered where female reporters have felt unsafe or threatened due to the combination of darkness and distance while returning to cars that are parked in deserted lots.

And, without question, there is a growing proliferation of prime-time games for television that have driven the ending of games and post-game writing duties into the wee hours of the morning.

As a result, we encourage you to review your parking locations and policies as it relates to media lot assignments.   We recognize that the demands for priority parking are difficult for schools and we are not suggesting wholesale changes.   But, we are providing you with suggested plans that will emphasize safety and potentially help avoid putting people in a working capacity – both writers and press box staff/volunteers – who are attending events you host in perceived dangerous situations.

Recommended Media Parking Guidelines

  • For distances longer than one-quarter of a mile, a golf-cart shuttle could be made available 2-3 hours before the game to help reporters move from the media lot to the sports venue. The pre-game shuttle would help address concerns for individuals where age, health, gender and the amount of equipment create concerns while moving from media lots that don’t offer easy access.
  • A golf cart and/or walking escort or campus security representative could be made available after games upon request to ensure media representatives covering a late night event have coverage while returning to the media lot and their car.
  • Provide a text service for reporters needing help either in going to the stadium or returning to the media lot. (The College Football Playoff is in the process of developing this approach along with Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, for the national championship game).
  • Media should be provided a detailed description of the location and distance from venue of all parking areas, along with shuttle availability before or after the game, in advance as part of the credential process.  This information should also be available on game day in the press box and other appropriate areas.

Thanks for your attention and consideration to this concern!

Steve Richardson (FWAA) * Gina Lehe (CFP) * Doug Vance (CoSIDA) * Joe Mitch (USBWA)