Best Writing Contest entry deadline extended

THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING ENTRIES IN THE FWAA’S 2018 BEST WRITING CONTEST HAS BEEN EXTENDED UNTIL JULY 15.

FWAA members may begin submitting entries in the 2018 Best Writing Contest now.

CATEGORIES
•Game Story (Immediate Deadline)
•Feature Story/Profile
•Enterprise/Investigative
•Column/Analysis/Commentary

BEAT WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD

In addition, see below, we have created a special award for the top beat writer as judged by a special FWAA committee headed by FWAA board member Malcolm Moran. He is now the director of the Sports Capital Journalism Program, IUPUI.

WRITING CONTEST RULES

You must be an FWAA member in good standing to enter.

Deadline: July 1, 2018. Entries sent after the deadline WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Limit: One (1) article per category, although a series of articles may be submitted in the enterprise category.

Entries must have appeared in print or on line between Feb. 1, 2017 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Entries must be submitted electronically to contest@fwaa.com.

Entries not sent to this e-mail address will not be accepted

Send MS Word or text files only. DO NOT SEND HTML files, Word Perfect files, stories in other word processing software or links to stories on the Internet or electronic libraries

Make your entry easy to read by taking out unnecessary carriage returns (They can give your entry an odd look when opened by a judge’s word processing program)

Delete any embedded advertising, photos and cutlines from the files (The file should contain only your story and your identifying information)

At the top of each entry, the following information should be included:
•Writer(s)
•Publication or online service
•Category
•Date of publication
•E-mail address and telephone number for the writer(s) of the entry

The entries will be sorted and stripped of identifying information and forwarded to the judge(s).

Files containing your entries should follow this naming convention: yourname-category.doc

The category must be one of these four words: Game, Feature, Enterprise or Column

Example: KenStephens-game.doc

Only entries sent electronically will be accepted and all entries will be sorted and stripped of identifying information and forwarded to the judge(s)

FWAA BEAT WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD: If you have a nomination of a beat writer who covers major college football (either a team or a conference) or you want to nominate yourself, please send an e-mail/letter explaining the qualifications of the person (no more than 250 words) to:

Malcolm Moran

Sports Capital Journalism Program IUPUI

University Library 3100J

755 W. Michigan

Indianapolis, IN 46202

Malcolm’s e-mail is malcolmmoran1@gmail.com. Malcolm and his committee will then make inquiries into the FWAA members nominated. In order to qualify for this award the person nominated must have been an FWAA member during the 2017 football season.

Questions? E-mail Ken Stephens at ken.stephens@sbcglobal.net.

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Deadline for Best Writing Contest entries is July 1

FWAA members can submit entries in the 2018 Best Writing Contest until July 1.

CATEGORIES

  • Game Story (Immediate Deadline)
  • Feature Story/Profile
  • Enterprise/Investigative
  • Column/Analysis/Commentary

BEAT WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD

In addition, see below, we have created a special award for the top beat writer as judged by a special FWAA committee headed by FWAA board member Malcolm Moran. He is now the director of the Sports Capital Journalism Program, IUPUI.

WRITING CONTEST RULES

You must be an FWAA member in good standing to enter.

Deadline: July 1, 2018. Entries sent after the deadline WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Limit: One (1) article per category, although a series of articles may be submitted in the enterprise category.

Entries must have appeared in print or on line between Feb. 1, 2017 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Entries must be submitted electronically to contest@fwaa.com.

Entries not sent to this e-mail address will not be accepted

Send MS Word or text files only. DO NOT SEND HTML files, Word Perfect files, stories in other word processing software or links to stories on the Internet or electronic libraries

Make your entry easy to read by taking out unnecessary carriage returns (They can give your entry an odd look when opened by a judge’s word processing program)

Delete any embedded advertising, photos and cutlines from the files (The file should contain only your story and your identifying information)

At the top of each entry, the following information should be included:

  • Writer(s)
  • Publication or online service
  • Category
  • Date of publication
  • E-mail address and telephone number for the writer(s) of the entry

The entries will be sorted and stripped of identifying information and forwarded to the judge(s).

Files containing your entries should follow this naming convention: yourname-category.doc

The category must be one of these four words: Game, Feature, Enterprise or Column

Example: KenStephens-game.doc

Only entries sent electronically will be accepted and all entries will be sorted and stripped of identifying information and forwarded to the judge(s)

FWAA BEAT WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD: If you have a nomination of a beat writer who covers major college football (either a team or a conference) or you want to nominate yourself, please send an e-mail/letter explaining the qualifications of the person (no more than 250 words) to:

Malcolm Moran

Sports Capital Journalism Program IUPUI

University Library 3100J

755 W. Michigan

Indianapolis, IN 46202

Malcolm’s e-mail is malcolmmoran1@gmail.com. Malcolm and his committee will then make inquiries into the FWAA members nominated. In order to qualify for this award the person nominated must have been an FWAA member during the 2017 football season.

Questions? E-mail Ken Stephens at ken.stephens@sbcglobal.net.

Reminder: Submit your entries in the FWAA Best Writing Contest

FWAA members may begin submitting entries in the 2018 Best Writing Contest now.

CATEGORIES

  • Game Story (Immediate Deadline)
  • Feature Story/Profile
  • Enterprise/Investigative
  • Column/Analysis/Commentary

BEAT WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD

In addition, see below, we have created a special award for the top beat writer as judged by a special FWAA committee headed by FWAA board member Malcolm Moran. He is now the director of the Sports Capital Journalism Program, IUPUI.

WRITING CONTEST RULES

You must be an FWAA member in good standing to enter.

Deadline: July 1, 2018. Entries sent after the deadline WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Limit: One (1) article per category, although a series of articles may be submitted in the enterprise category.

Entries must have appeared in print or on line between Feb. 1, 2017 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Entries must be submitted electronically to contest@fwaa.com.

Entries not sent to this e-mail address will not be accepted

Send MS Word or text files only. DO NOT SEND HTML files, Word Perfect files, stories in other word processing software or links to stories on the Internet or electronic libraries

Make your entry easy to read by taking out unnecessary carriage returns (They can give your entry an odd look when opened by a judge’s word processing program)

Delete any embedded advertising, photos and cutlines from the files (The file should contain only your story and your identifying information)

At the top of each entry, the following information should be included:

  • Writer(s)
  • Publication or online service
  • Category
  • Date of publication
  • E-mail address and telephone number for the writer(s) of the entry

The entries will be sorted and stripped of identifying information and forwarded to the judge(s).

Files containing your entries should follow this naming convention: yourname-category.doc

The category must be one of these four words: Game, Feature, Enterprise or Column

Example: KenStephens-game.doc

Only entries sent electronically will be accepted and all entries will be sorted and stripped of identifying information and forwarded to the judge(s)

FWAA BEAT WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD: If you have a nomination of a beat writer who covers major college football (either a team or a conference) or you want to nominate yourself, please send an e-mail/letter explaining the qualifications of the person (no more than 250 words) to:

Malcolm Moran

Sports Capital Journalism Program IUPUI

University Library 3100J

755 W. Michigan

Indianapolis, IN 46202

Malcolm’s e-mail is malcolmmoran1@gmail.com. Malcolm and his committee will then make inquiries into the FWAA members nominated. In order to qualify for this award the person nominated must have been an FWAA member during the 2017 football season.

Questions? E-mail Ken Stephens at ken.stephens@sbcglobal.net.

2017 Best Feature: John Crist

By John Crist

Saturday Down South

My phone rings. The caller ID reads “Dak Prescott.” He’s getting back to me shortly after I left him a message. Turns out he was in the middle of a workout. He’s still out of breath.

It’s Monday. I’m in Tampa. He’s in Orlando. But by Wednesday, we’ll both be in Indianapolis for the Scouting Combine — the annual meat market for college players ahead of the NFL Draft. I’ll be there as a member of the media. Prescott, of course, is a prospect following a spectacular career at Mississippi State.

He’s the best quarterback ever to play in Starkville, and he may just be the single best player in school history. Prescott elevated a mediocre program in a brutal conference to heights never seen before.

Nevertheless, when the draft experts go through the list of top QBs, his name isn’t mentioned. Jared Goff of California, Carson Wentz of North Dakota State — yes, FCS-level NDSU — and Paxton Lynch of Memphis are considered the first-tier passers. Prescott is a second-tier guy alongside the likes of Michigan State’s Connor Cook and Penn State’s Christian Hackenberg.

He’s currently projected as a mid-round pick. But if Prescott is worried, he hides it well. He sounds authentic and confident without an iota of cockiness.

“(Other quarterbacks) are going to get their hype,” he says. “Just going to camps, even the combine, I don’t know that I’ll make people drop their pen and drop their jaw and say, ‘We’ve got to get this guy first off the board.’ That hasn’t been the player I’ve been all my life.”

More…

2017 Best Enterprise: David Ching

By David Ching
ESPN.com

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — When they received word that UAB football was coming back, Lee Dufour and Nick Vogel — best friends and former roommates at the school — could not wait to share the news with each other.

Unfortunately, they heard about it at the exact same time.

“Literally the second that they announced football’s coming back, I called him and at the same time, he called me. The calls didn’t go through,” Dufour said, recalling the moment last June when UAB reversed its decision from December 2014 to drop its football program. “I was like, ‘Yes, we have to go back. Whatever we have to go through, we’re coming back.'”

Added Vogel: “We were both going nuts trying to call each other. We both missed a couple calls in a row until we got ahold of each other. We were overjoyed.”

Both players had found new college football programs after UAB’s implosion: offensive lineman Dufour at South Alabama and kicker Vogel at Southern Miss. And yet they missed the friendships and connections that formed in their short time in Birmingham.

They had promised each other they would return to UAB if it ever reinstated the football program, and this was the opportunity many thought would never come.

“That was my primary plan in life: it’s going to come back and I’m going to leave this place and go back to my home in Birmingham,” Vogel said. “I know that sounds completely insane, but when I made the deal with Lee, I was 100 percent behind it. I genuinely thought it would come back.”

Dufour and Vogel are among 16 players from the 2014 team who were back at UAB in time for its recently completed spring practice. However, many of their 2014 teammates with eligibility remaining did not return.

More…

2017 Best Column: Glenn Guilbeau

By Glenn Guilbeau

USA Today Network/Gannett Louisiana

BATON ROUGE – Close your eyes and imagine it is a year ago when then-LSU coach Les Miles was about to be fired, and someone tells you that the next coach is going to be LSU defensive line coach Ed Orgeron.

Now, open your eyes.

Orgeron – a career journeyman coach, a failed head coach and a somewhat successful short term head coach at USC and LSU – is LSU’s next football coach.

“I’m the search,” LSU athletic director Joe Alleva said two months ago after firing Miles.

“I’m worried,” I said.

Well, I’m still worried.

Alleva first started looking for a new head football coach more than a year ago and started thinking about looking for a new head football coach when he came here in 2008. And this is it?

This is an embarrassment.

More…

2017 Best Game Story: Andrea Adelson

By Andrea Adelson
ESPN.com

TAMPA, Fla. — The game clock showed 2:01. Deshaun Watson gathered his teammates and told them simply, “We’re going to get this touchdown. We’re going to win this national championship.”

Nobody on that sideline doubted. Not with Watson under center. Everybody wearing orange and purple firmly believed they had the best player in the country on their side, Heisman or no Heisman. They reminded everybody: Heismans are voted on; championships are won.

This would be it for him, on the last drive, in his last game.

“I’d seen the two minutes and one second on the clock, and I just smiled and I just knew,” Watson said after Monday’s title game. “I told myself, ‘They left too much time on the clock.'”

First play, pass complete. Second play, pass complete. Down the field they went, a march toward inevitability. When Watson arrived at Clemson in January 2013, he tweeted, “Me. In a National Championship Game. I’m just waiting on that moment.”

It came on first-and-goal at the Alabama 2. The play call came in: Crush. Watson would roll out and go to receiver Hunter Renfrow in the flat.

“We knew that play was going to work,” Clemson receiver Mike Williams said. “When you want it the most, you go out with your best call. We knew that was our best call.”

The play call was brilliant. So was its execution.

“I saw the whole play develop, and I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, wide open,'” Tigers defensive lineman Christian Wilkins said. “I’m on field goal unit, so I sprinted right onto the field as Deshaun was throwing it. I knew it was game. One second left. It was beautiful timing.” More…

2017 FWAA Best Writing Contest winners announced

DALLAS — Three writers — Alex Scarborough and Jake Trotter of ESPN.com and Dennis Dodd of CBS Sports — each claimed two individual awards and Glenn Guilbeau of USA TODAY Network/Gannett Louisiana repeated as a first-place winner in the 25th Annual FWAA Best Writing Contest.

ESPN.com writers collected 10 individual or co-bylined awards, including 1-2-3 sweeps in the Game Story and Enterprise categories.

First-place winners will receive game balls, certificates and cash prizes. Second and third-place winners will get certificates and cash prizes. Honorable mention award recipients will receive certificates. All will be recognized at the annual FWAA Awards Breakfast on Jan. 8, 2018 in Atlanta.

GAME

First Place — Andrea Adelson, ESPN.com

Second Place — Alex Scarborough, ESPN.com

Third Place — Jake Trotter, ESPN.com

Honorable Mention — John Feinstein, Washington Post; Dennis Dodd, CBS Sports; Matt Fortuna, ESPN.com; Rich Scarcella, Reading Eagle

FEATURES

First Place —  John Crist, Saturday Down South

Second Place — Mike Vorel, South Bend (Ind.) Tribune

Third Place —  Nate Mink, The Post-Standard (Syracuse, N.Y.)/Syracuse.com

Honorable Mention —  Alex Scarborough, ESPN.com; Jake Trotter, ESPN.com;  Daniel Uthman, USA TODAY

COLUMNS

First Place — Glenn Guilbeau, USA TODAY Network/Gannett Louisiana

Second Place — J.P. Scott, Athlon Sports

Third Place — Ryan McGee, ESPN.com

Honorable Mention — Matt Hayes, Bleacher Report; Ivan Maisel, ESPN.com

ENTERPRISE

First Place — David Ching, ESPN.com

Second Place — Mark Schlabach and Paula Lavigne, ESPN.com

Third Place — Kyle Bonagura and Mark Fainaru-Wada, ESPN.com

Honorable Mention — Harry B. Minium Jr., Norfolk Virginian-Pilot; Dennis Dodd, CBS Sports; Pete Thamel, Sports Illustrated; Michael Casagrande,  AL.com/Alabama Media Group; Jack Ebling and Joe Rexrode, Dog Ear Publishing; Andrew Greif, The Oregonian

2016 Best Game Story: Glenn Guilbeau

Comment by the judge, Mickey Spagnola: This LSU-Texas A&M contest was a complex game, and thought the writer did a wonderful job capturing the emotion of what was taking place with LSU head coach Les Miles, but also gave us a feel for the actually took place in the game, too. Great depth to this piece. A pleasure to read.

By Glenn Guilbeau, Lafayette Advertiser/Gannett Louisiana Newspapers

BATON ROUGE – After two weeks of being stalked by the elephant in the room wanting to fire him, LSU football coach Les Miles rode a pair of “elephants” off into the sunrise. His sunset will have to wait.

LSU trampled Texas A&M, 19-7, Saturday night in the regular season finale to snap a three-game losing streak and save Miles’ job in front of 80,000 at Tiger Stadium. Then offensive tackle Vadal Alexander, who is 6-foot-6 and 320 pounds, and defensive tackle Christian LaCouture, who is 6-5, 300, put Miles, a hefty former Michigan guard in his own right, on their shoulders and carried him across the field amid chants of “Keep Les Miles … Keep Les Miles.”

Moments later, Miles met with LSU President F. King Alexander, who assured him he would remain the Tigers’ coach following two weeks of his job hanging in the balance as LSU athletic director Joe Alleva and some members of the Board of Supervisors, cast as Miles’ executioners, readied to release him.

“Scary. I want you to know, scary,” Miles said of the players’ ride, not the walk through the valley of fired at press conferences, a radio show and a Gridiron Club booster meeting over the last week.

“I want you to know, one, they’re tall,” Miles said of his purple and gold elephants. “And when you’re sitting up there, you know, I now know what it’s like to ride an elephant. Scares you to death, and you just pray that you can hang on to the ears, because there’s just not much to grab on to. But I was thrilled. I was touched, pleased.”

Miles had little to cling to over the last two weeks as well. Three publications produced stories that said Miles was coaching for his job after 30-16 and 31-14 losses to Alabama and Arkansas that followed a 7-0 start, 4-0 opening in the Southeastern Conference and a No. 2 national ranking. Then LSU Board of Supervisors member Ronald Anderson said that even if Miles beat Ole Miss and Texas A&M to finish 9-2, “it’s still something that needs to be looked at,” in reference to Miles’ job status.

“It’s the way they lost the two games,” Anderson said.

Then LSU lost the third straight game in similar fashion, falling behind early by 24-0 at Ole Miss and only getting back in the game briefly before a 34-17 loss that completed the trilogy. Not since 1966 had the Tigers lost three in a row by 14 or more.

Suddenly, it looked over, particularly amid reports that Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher and/or his agent, Jimmy Sexton, had been contacted about Fisher, who was the offensive coordinator when LSU won its first national championship in 45 years in 2003 and won the 2013 national title at Florida State, taking the job.

Miles talked like it was over or near over as well at two press conferences last week, at his radio show Wednesday night and at a Gridiron Club booster meeting on Friday where he said it looked like he would not be coaching LSU’s bowl game. All the while, Alleva said nothing, saying only that he would comment after the season.

“I’d get up in the morning early, have me a little breakfast, and I’d go off to work,” Miles said when asked about his last two weeks, knowing he may be fired. “Occasionally I’d see somebody staring at me, like, ‘Are you going to? Are you not going to?’ I’d say to them, ‘I’m going to work. I love my job. I’m doing my job as best I can.’”

Then, the momentum of the Fire Miles movement slowed by Friday as national media continued to harshly criticize LSU for being on the verge of firing the freewheeling “Mad Hatter” despite a .769 winning percentage, a national championship in 2007, a national championship game appearance in 2011, two SEC titles and four double-digit win seasons from 2010-13. On Saturday morning, Board of Supervisors member Stanley Jacobs finally broke LSU’s silence with a statement to Gannett Louisiana supportive of Miles.

“There has been much speculation that Les Miles is coaching his last game tonight,” Jacobs said. “For that to happen, there would have had to have been a recommendation to the Board of Supervisors. No recommendation has been made. He is our coach, and I wish him well.”

Later Saturday, the Palm Beach Post reported Fisher had told Florida State’s president he was staying at Florida State. Then LSU defeated Texas A&M as Miles was cheered before kickoff at Senior Night ceremonies and during and after the game. Alleva, meanwhile, was roundly booed when he appeared via recording on the giant video board welcoming fans to Death Valley before the game. The fans’ signs in the stadium favored Miles in a landslide. “Keep The Hat, Fire The Rat,” said one.

“When I walked out there for Senior Day, I did expect cheers,” Miles said. “But it was their insistence of cheering and getting my attention. I wondered at first, ‘Is that for me?’ Then I said, ‘That must be for me.’ So I took my hat off, and boy I tell you, I was just really pleased.”

LSU proceeded to run behind Alexander and company to a vintage Miles victory – 244 yards rushing and only 83 passing – while the troubled defense held the Aggies to 89 yards on the ground and 250 total.

“It was a nice night,” Miles said. “Victory is always enjoyed, especially when it comes a couple of weeks late. It’s nice to be the head coach at LSU. Proud to be associated with a great institution. It’s a joy. Nice to have them come say, ‘You know the job you’ve been doing, you still can do it.’ And I like that.”

Alleva tried to make nice afterwards. “I want to make it very clear and positive that Les Miles is our football coach,” he said. “And he will continue to be our football coach. Les and I have talked, We have talked about this program, and we are committed together to work and compete at the highest level.”

Jacobs is glad Miles will be still LSU’s coach. “I’m thrilled to death that Les is staying,” Jacobs said after the game. “I did not know he would be until we started winning in the second half. He deserves to be our head coach.”

Not all board members were as happy. Anderson was reached after the game, but had no comment, though he did intimate that Miles may have had him in mind when answering a question after the game concerning those who wanted him gone.

“There’s probably a guy or two I’d like to meet in an alley and just have a little straight talk with,” Miles said. “But I’m not built that way.”

Miles won his LSU career saving game his way – with the run and not the pass. “The game itself was an imperfect fistfight,” Miles said. “The guy who delivered our body blows was Leonard Fournette.”

Fournette gained 159 yards on 32 carries, and the sophomore tailback from New Orleans became the school’s all-time leading rusher for a season with 1,741 yards, passing Charles Alexander’s 1,686 in 1977. His 4-yard touchdown run with 2:50 to go put the game on ice at 19-7 and started more of the “Keep Les Miles” chants.

“The motor seems to be pretty stinking strong,” Miles said defiantly when asked if he was told to change his offense for next year.

“I can say, it’s been one of the longest few weeks of my life,” Fournette said. “It was hard for everybody. It’s been hard – not just about Coach Miles, but when you lose three. It wasn’t easy. It’s hard to deal with.”

The Tigers (8-3, 5-3 Southeastern Conference) will likely return to the top 25 on Sunday, and next week will learn its bowl destination. A bowl in which Miles now plans on coaching.

“I want you to know something, I love coaching football,” Miles said.

“The players love him as our coach,” LSU wide receiver Malachi Dupre said. “I love him as my coach. He’s been a great coach since before we’ve been here. He’s built a legacy here.”

The Tigers won at least eight games in a season for the 16th consecutive season and will be going to a 16th straight bowl – 11 straight under Miles.

“We wanted to come in here, and we wanted to get a win,” LaCouture said after letting Miles off his shoulders. “We needed it. We wanted it. Coach Miles deserved it. We love him to death. We thought as a team that he deserved the win. Let’s make one thing clear – the chain of command starts with Coach Miles. That’s how we think of it. We wouldn’t want anyone else here.”

Glenn Guilbeau

Glenn Guilbeau gguilbeau@gannett.com

Glenn Guilbeau

AGE: 55

COLLEGE: University of Missouri-Columbia

BACKGROUND: Guilbeau won a first place this year  for the first time since the 2001 contest, when he took Game Story in the now-defunct “Loose Deadline” category, which appealed to him, for an account of “morning in Tiger Stadium” after a watershed upset the night before by unranked LSU and first-year coach Nick Saban over No. 11 Tennessee. His Game Story winner in the current contest on tight deadline was an account of LSU’s 19-7 victory over Texas A&M last season that saved Coach Les Miles job until early this season that is. Guilbeau also placed second this year for a Column describing the same dramatic week when Miles’ future hung in the balance a year ago. His honorable mention was for a Feature on LSU running back Leonard Fournette. … Guilbeau, a native of the New Orleans area, had honorable mention in Column in 2015 and 2014 and placed several times in early FWAA contests in the 1990s with a second in Game Story, two thirds in Column and a fourth in Enterprise. He has covered college football for more than 30 years at the Tiger Rag Magazine in Baton Rouge (1983-84), the Montgomery Advertiser (1985-86), the Alexandria Town Talk (1987-93), the Mobile Register (1993-98), the Baton Rouge Advocate (1998-2004) and since 2004 at the Gannett Louisiana/USA Today Network, where he also covers the Saints. Guilbeau lives in Baton Rouge with his wife, Michelle, a former political reporter at the Baton Rouge Advocate who is now communications director for state treasurer John Kennedy, and their boxer mix Bailey Bama, who (don’t tell LSU fans) is from a pound in Union Springs, Ala., and has never seen LSU beat Alabama in football.

2016 Best Column: Lindsay Schnell

Comment by the judge, Mickey Spagnola: This category might have produced the best group of columns I’ve read in many years. Nice writing and very enterprising column ideas. But as I usually remind, make sure the column has something to say, not just a glorified feature. Now I made a few exceptions this year since a several of the second lace, third place and honorable mention columns told great stories and were well written. But I picked the winner over some of these great human interest stories because the writer wrote a true column, took a stand on a sensitive subject and had a strong opinion. Backed it up with emotion and fact. Same with the second-place winners, tough can’t believe I made an exception for columns starting with “I,” a pet-peeve of mine. But somehow these worked. Wish I had more awards to hand out.

By Lindsay Schnell, CampusRush.com

MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — He started his media availability, as many athletes in this era do, by posing for a selfie, making sure anyone who would later view the photo could see all those gathered to talk to him.

Yes, 522 days after becoming infamous, Joe Mixon finally faced the media Tuesday morning at Orange Bowl media day.

Mixon told the roughly 50 reporters gathered around his small table that he was there to answer football questions only, a point previously made clear by an Orange Bowl representative who said that any media member who didn’t stick to the script would be asked to leave. This, for a player who was making his first public media appearance since he punched a female Oklahoma student and broke bones in her face in four places in July 2014—and who was allowed to stay on scholarship and earn his way back on to coach Bob Stoops’s football team.

But rather than answer questions, Mixon deflected them, just as he has done all season with would-be tacklers in the Sooners’ drive to the College Football Playoff semifinal Thursday against Clemson.

Two months before former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice blew up America’s willingness to tolerate an athlete’s violence against women, Mixon was granted a second chance by one of the premier programs in college football, which is on the verge of playing for its eighth national championship.

Mixon is one of the most talented tailbacks in college football. The 6′ 1″, 217-pound redshirt freshman averaged 6.8 yards per carry, gained 749 rushing yards and 345 receiving yards, and scored 11 touchdowns this season for 11–1 Oklahoma. He came to Norman from Oakley, Calif., as a five-star recruit lauded for his playmaking ability. And this fall, Mixon and sophomore tailback Samaje Perine have formed one of the best rushing tandems in the country. Mixon’s play has been crucial for a team determined to show last year’s 8–5 season was a fluke, and that the Sooners still belong in college football’s upper tier.

Mixon pleaded in October 2014 to a misdemeanor assault charge stemming from an incident the month before outside a Norman restaurant. Days before the Sooners started fall camp, Mixon punched a female student, knocking her to the ground and breaking her jaw. Yes, the victim put her hands on Mixon first. There is no doubt this is a complicated situation, but that’s not an excuse. This is a clear-cut issue. Hitting a woman should never be accepted. Ever.

It’s 2015, and we like to say we take these issues seriously.

But really, do we take them seriously enough?

The victim underwent surgery and Mixon was suspended from the football program for a year in August 2014. Except he was kept on scholarship, and he did not lose any NCAA eligibility. Oklahoma lists 2014 as a redshirt season for Mixon. So he sat out his first year on campus (which is common for freshmen at major college football programs) and he didn’t practice.

Some fans think this story is old news and that the media needs to move on. As soon as Mixon is willing to answer some questions—remember, this is first time he has spoken to reporters since the incident—we will. Alas, he wasn’t interested in that Tuesday. (Mixon said his lawyer advised him not to answer any nonfootball questions on Tuesday.)

Asked if he had a desire to answer any nonfootball questions, Mixon said no.

Asked if he thinks he should answer those, he said, “Not here.”

Asked if he was worried about alienating female football fans, he said, “Next question.”

Asked if he feels sorry for what happened, he said, “I won’t answer that.”

He credited his coaches, teammates and girlfriend with helping him stay the course in his year off the field.

Early in the media session, Mixon said he would describe himself as a great person, and I—one of the few female sports reporters in the scrum—followed up, asking why he would choose to use that adjective. He answered by saying that if we got to know him, we would see how he was and become convinced.

Mixon may not understand it yet, but great people are about action, not talk. If someone is truly great or humble or intelligent, he or she shouldn’t have to say so. Great people answer the tough questions and confront difficult situations simply because they hold themselves to a higher standard.

Would the female he punched—or her father—describe Mixon as a great person? Would any person off the street who is not an Oklahoma fan read about Mixon’s off-field situation and say he is great? If a man struck Mixon’s girlfriend, Taylor Sibella, or Stoops’s daughter, Mackenzie, and broke four bones in her face, would Mixon describe that guy as a great person?

In the spring, Oklahoma president David Boren expelled two students who had led racist chants during a Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity event that had been captured on video. In a press release, Boren praised his school for how it handled the divisive video, saying: “I am extremely proud of the reaction and response expressed by our entire university family—students, faculty, staff, and alumni about this incident. They are ‘Real Sooners’ who believe in mutual respect for all.”

Perhaps he meant to say “for all men,” because allowing one male student to break the jaw of a female student and remain on scholarship is anything but mutually respectful.

In the wake of the SAE incident, Sooners senior linebacker Eric Striker became a spokesman for social justice, passionately condemning racism and demanding that his campus and community recognize the need for a zero-tolerance policy. Striker is one of the most thoughtful and engaging athletes in sports today. And it’s great that Oklahoma, as a football program and a university, is represented by someone like him, as well as by senior center Ty Darlington and redshirt junior quarterback Trevor Knight, who also took strong stands on the issue.

But the school is also represented by Mixon, redshirt senior linebacker Frank Shannon (suspended in 2014 following a Title IX sexual assault investigation) and, last year, by wide receiver Dorial Green-Beckham (welcomed to Oklahoma after being dismissed from Missouri in April 2014 following accusations of physically assaulting two women).

When asked about this, athletic director Joe Castiglione said each case is different, and advised reporters to look into Oklahoma’s track record before concluding that the program has created a culture tolerant of violence against women. I did: Mixon, Shannon and Green-Beckham—three tremendously talented athletes, each with the skills to help the Sooners win football games, and each with a well-known history of disrespecting women. What was that about mutual respect?

I asked Striker and Darlington, both of whom will riff on pretty much any topic, if they had concerns about Oklahoma looking hypocritical in all of this. The Sooners are arguably the most socially conscious team in collegiate athletics: They want to set the tone not just in how they win championships, but also in how they speak out for what they believe. Yet here they are, in the College Football Playoff, partially because their coaching staff and administration were willing to welcome back a player who punched a woman.

To their credit, Striker and Darlington answered the question. Striker said he believes people make mistakes and shouldn’t be judged solely for them. Darlington said this is a nuanced issue that can’t be wrapped up in a 15-second sound bite.

Both are correct, but still I’d like to ask Mixon a few of those prohibited nonfootball questions:

Why does this program get to pick and choose when it takes a stand on a touchy subject?

Why did he deserve a second chance, and why did that chance get to come at the highest level?

Do the Sooners, a championship-level program, hold themselves to the highest standard?

Is he remorseful?

What would he say to a young girl in Norman who asks her parents why that football player they cheer for hit someone like her?

And finally, this: Does he worry about his image, or has he reached the same conclusion as the 85,000-plus fans who stand in thunderous applause every time he scores a touchdown in Norman?

The video of Mixon’s punch isn’t available to the public, so he continues to skate by. There might be lots of dispute about him being a great person, but everyone can agree he is a great football player.

Lindsay Schnell

Lindsay Schnell

Lindsay Schnell

AGE: 29

COLLEGE: Oregon State

BACKGROUND: Lindsay has been a staff writer at Sports Illustrated since February, 2013. Prior to that she covered the Ducks and Beavers for The Oregonian in Portland, Ore., where she still lives (she does not enjoy craft beer or running, so please don’t ask her for brewery or trail recommendations). The daughter of a long-time college basketball coach (her father) and former Pac-10 official (her mother), she grew up a hoops junkie, but decided she could cover this football thing after witnessing Oregon State’s stunning upset over No. 3 USC in 2006, her sophomore year at OSU.  At SI, she writes a weekly walk-on series, and last year was honored by the USBWA for her profile of college basketball’s most eccentric character, Bill Walton. She’d led the charge in narrative podcasting at SI, a new passion of hers. In her “free time” she enjoys interior decorating and outfit styling, and is mulling the creation of a lifestyle blog. In the offseason she adopted a black lab mix and named him Lupin, after her favorite Harry Potter character, which was basically the best decision of all time.