From copyboy to Colorado Classic, Irv Moss did it all in career that spanned more than 60 years

Editor’s note: Terry Frei of the Denver Post recently paid tribute to Irv Moss, who retired from the paper at age 81 on June 20.

Irv Moss of the Denver Post, who was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the FWAA. Photo by Melissa Macatee.

Irv Moss of the Denver Post, who was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the FWAA. Photo by Melissa Macatee.

Moss, who has covered events in Colorado for 60 years, received the FWAA Lifetime Achievement Award in January during the FWAA’s annual awards breakfast.

Here is a portion of Terry’s story.

In the spring of 1956, Denver Post sports editor Chuck Garrity was impressed with the newsroom copyboy’s hustle as he delivered the stock market ticker tape and wire-service copy to various departments.

Eventually, Garrity asked the young man: “Do you want to try this?”

“This” was sports writing.

 Sure, Irv Moss said.

Garrity assigned Moss to cover the men’s fast-pitch softball league at City Park, which routinely drew standing-room-only crowds of more than 5,000. If the untried Moss fouled up the high-profile assignment, Garrity would hear about it.

Moss got his story in and in June 1956 became a full-fledged writer in the Post’s sports department. After a stay of more than 60 years at the Post, Moss’ final day as a full-time reporter was June 24, making him one of the longest serving newspaper employees in the country. He will continue to write the Rockies’ minor-league report on a freelance basis through August.

“It was an interesting time to watch, and in a way, be part of the changing of Denver as a sports city,” Moss, 81, said. “When I first started down here, City Park softball was the big story. And next thing you know, we’re one of the top sports markets in the country.”

To read Terry’s entire story, CLICK HERE.

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Photo gallery: FWAA Awards Breakfast

These photos were taken at the FWAA’s annual Awards Breakfast on Jan. 11 in Scottsdale, Ariz.  Winners of the 2015 Best Writing Contest as well as the Bert McGrane Award winner were honored, among others.

Denver Post’s Irv Moss gets FWAA Lifetime Achievement Award

 

Irv Moss of the Denver Post, center, receives a commemorative football in recognition of his Lifetime Achievement Award from 2015 FWAA President Lee Barfknecht, left, and Tim Simmons of BFI Events, right.  Photo by Melissa Macatee for the FWAA.

Irv Moss of the Denver Post, center, receives a commemorative football in recognition of his Lifetime Achievement Award from 2015 FWAA President Lee Barfknecht, left, and Tim Simmons of BFI Events, right. Photo by Melissa Macatee for the FWAA.

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.— Longtime Denver Post writer Irv Moss received the FWAA Lifetime Achievement Award on Monday morning during the association’s annual awards breakfast at the College Football Playoff title game media hotel.

Moss, 81,  is a graduate of Denver West High School, and has covered events in the state of Colorado for 60 years.

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  • He is both a Ram and Pioneer as he attended both Colorado State and the University of Denver.
  • He is a U. S. Army veteran.
  • He has been covering sports in the “Centennial” state for seven decades (60 years).
  • He started writing sports for The Denver Post on February 8, 1956.
  • He has also covered the Winter and Summer Olympic Games.
  • He will be inducted this month into the Colorado High School Sports Hall-of-Fame.
  • He was a long-time member of the selection committee for the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame.
  • He has been nominated for the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame.
  • He still writes the “Colorado Classic” column for the Denver Post.
  • During his first of 46-seasons as the Air Force “beat” writer in 1970, the Falcons posted a 9-3 record, finished as the 16th ranked team in the country, defeated Stanford and Jim Plunkett 31-14 and played Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl.  That season, Stanford defeated No. 2 Ohio State in the Rose Bowl.
  • He has covered five of the seven football coaches at Air Force, including Ben Martin, Bill Parcells, Ken Hatfield, Fischer DeBerry and now Troy Calhoun.
  • Bob Whitlow and Buck Shaw were the first two Air Force Academy coaches and he probably saw the Falcons play during their first three seasons of competition (1955, 1956 and 1957) when their games were at the University of Denver.
  • He has covered 20 of the 24 Air Force bowl games (10-10 record).
  • He is probably the only media person to cover every commander-in-chief trophy competition since the start of the series in 1972.
  • He has covered 84 CIC games as Air Force has won the trophy 19 times.
  • He has covered 28 of the 30 games in the Air Force-Notre Dame series.
  • He saw the Falcons defeat the Irish four-straight seasons (1982-1985).
  • He saw two Falcon squads ranked among the Top 10 (1985 and 1998, when Air Force finished 12-1 both seasons).
  • He covered the 1985 Air Force team that is considered the most successful season in Academy football history. The Falcons came within one win of playing for the national championship (Oklahoma vs. Penn State) as Air Force recorded 10 straight wins to start the season, climbed the polls to No. 2 in the nation, but lost to BYU by seven points in the next-to-last game of the regular season. Air Force rebounded with a bowl win over Texas in the Bluebonnet Bowl and finished as the No. 5 ranked team in the nation.
  •  Moss has covered everything from A to Z in the Rocky Mountain Empire.
  • That starts with Air Force Football ends with Zebulon’s failure to climb Pike’s Peak in 1806.
  • He covered Wyoming football and wrote about the Black 14 in 1969.
  •  Twenty years later, he helped break the story with the late Dick Connor about Bertram M. Lee and Peter C.B. Bynoe making sports history as the first African-American owners of a sports franchise (Nuggets).
  • He has been quoted in the book Freddie Steinmark: Faith, Family, Football — “If you’ve ever swatted at a fly with your hand, you know what the Lakewood High School football team faced when it tried to stop a 77-yard touchdown run by Wheat Ridge’s Fred Steinmark that whipped the Tigers.”  And to note, John Hancock coached Lakewood.